Apr 4
6 Steps to Rebuilding Respect at Work
When I published my most recent book, The Respectful Leader, in 2016, employee surveys were giving us early warning signals of disrespectful behavior increasing in the workplace. Leading up to the U.S. presidential election, the political climate and the amount of incivility in public discourse continued to heat up. Shortly afterward, disrespect started to rocket upwards in the workplace. Over the past few months, debates have escalated over gun control, healthcare, immigration, sexual harassment, and other issues. With political divides seemingly at an all-time high, it can often feel like all respect is lost amid the tension. So what's the…
Jan 16
5 Non-Confrontational Ways to Encourage Employee Accountability
When managing a project, sometimes it takes a little extra TLC to get your team on board, working at their greatest potential, and delivering maximum results. But few people enjoy working while being observed through a microscope. So how do you encourage employees without coming across as pushy or confrontational? Entrepreneur Guest Writer Lucas Miller offers his secret recipe for successful project management that naturally cultivates employee accountability. Assess Capabilities | Great leaders challenge employees to push beyond their perceived limits. But pushing too far can set both parties up for failure. Before you assign a task or judge an…
Jan 2
To Be a Great Leader, Learn to Delegate
One of the greatest challenges for many new managers lies in a self-transformation from task master to leader. This transition involves the ability to effectively delegate responsibilities to other team members and empower them to succeed. Harvard Business Review Contributor Jesse Sostrin discusses this common management dilemma and offers strategies to help streamline your workflow, build employee competency, and boost your leadership impact. While your coworkers may admire your willingness to roll up your sleeves and get the job done, you’ll inevitably overextend yourself and alienate team members from valuable work experience when holding onto tasks that should be delegated.…
Oct 24
Helping Employees Fill the Passion Gap at Work
Are deadlines and production quotas casting a shadow over your team’s enthusiasm on the job? Are you asking the right questions along the way? A lot has been written about a leader’s role in helping employees tap into their passion on the job, yet a 2014 Deloitte study suggests lack of excitement is a big weak spot in America’s workforce. Researchers found up to 87% of workers aren’t achieving their full potential due to lack of passion for their work. Connecting employees to the big picture, finding out what drives them, and knowing when to let go is a challenging puzzle for…
Sep 12
How To Instill Mindfulness in the Workplace
Modern office employees are surrounded by a constant flood of information. They have to constantly manage notifications, apps, devices and real-time requests on top of demanding job tasks. Too much clutter can produce a culture of disinterest and disconnection. Jeff Pruitt, Chairman and CEO of Tallwave, offers insights in his article, “3 Ways Leaders Can Instill Mindfulness At Work.” Start with the leadership. Creating a positive culture starts at the top. As a leader within the organization, you need to create a space that allows you and your employees to bring innovative, strategic thinking into their positions. It’s easy for…
Jul 26
Tools & Techniques | Owning Your Mistakes
Unless you're perfect (is anyone?), chances are you're going to make at least one or two mistakes in your career. Although you may fear the repercussions from admitting a mistake, denying it will only make matters worse. You're more likely to be forgiven (and keep your job) if you own your mistakes. Here's how. Own it. Admit that you made a mistake and describe it. Make no excuses. Don't blame anyone or anything. Just say, "This is on me." Describe the impact. Acknowledge the potential impact of your mistake. Described what you learned. Ensure people know you are learning from this mistake. Suggest a…
Jul 26
Just Say No
I'm a "can-do," kind of person - I'm always letting my colleagues and clients know "I'm here to help; whatever you need." Part of this tendency is just my nature; I truly enjoy being of service to others, even if there's no fee involved. Another reason I'm this way is because, let's face it, saying "no," or "I can't help you," to your clients is not a winning business strategy. But that's exactly what I should have done with one recent client. It was one of the most difficult lessons I've had to learn in my 25-year career, not only…
Jul 18
These Four Things Will Help You Manage Your Stress
We all know how detrimental stress can be to the body and mind: it’s been linked to heart disease, depression, and obesity, and it can even dampen your cognitive performance. Managing stress is important, yet extremely difficult. In “10 Ways Smart People Stay Calm,” emotional intelligence expert Travis Bradberry gives techniques for combating stress. Next time you’re overwhelmed, give these techniques a try. Be grateful. Simply thinking about what you’re thankful for can reduce cortisol, a stress hormone, by 23%. Pondering some reasons you’re grateful can improve your mood, energy, and physical well-being. Think positively. Focus your brain on non-stressful…
Feb 28
Can Respect Solve Employee Engagement Issues?
Victor Lipman, head of Howling Wolf Management Training, describes respect as a lubricant that keeps organizations running smoothly. In the Forbes article “Why Respect Is Key To Employee Engagement,” he explains how respect and employee engagement go hand in hand. Respect makes people feel included. If you respect your employees and let them know that their skills and efforts are appreciated, they’ll feel like a part of the team and are more likely to feel motivated at work. Employees will want to work hard for people that respect them. If workers feel valued and respected, they’ll view management in a…
Jul 16
Vacation Imperative!
Hello from Prague! As a freelancer for nearly 25 years, I can count on one hand the number of times I've taken a "real" (meaning longer than 3-4 days) vacation. This is a big mistake; and I should know better, especially since I'm always advising my clients to pay attention to their work-life balance. But things - almost always related to work, such as writing the next book, preparing to teach the next class, blogging, you name it - always seemed to get in the way. And I kept telling myself 'I don't have the time (or the money!) to…